Chess Interview: GM Denes Boros from Hungary


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Denes Boros is an active Chess Grandmaster with a degree in Psychology. An experienced Chess Coach and Chess Journalist. Boros was the Chess Journalist at the Carlsen-Karjakin World Championship Match in New York City.  You can contact him via email: Dennisboros64@gmail.com , Twitter: @Gmasterg4, and on Facebook: GM Denes Boros.

General Questions

When and how did you start playing chess?

I was around 6 or 7 years old, when I saw my oldest brother playing chess. Curiosity got the best of me and I learned more about the game by watching my brother and his coach play and study chess together.

What studying techniques did you use to get to your current level?

I read books, lots of books! I especially enjoyed a book by Istvan Bilek, who wrote about the 1978 victory of the Hungarian Olympic Team at Buenos Aires. I found my first chess hero’s in that book, the ever-creative Sax Gyula!

The second book I read, was about Garry Kasparov and his road to becoming a World Champion. It was a peculiar read, as it was from his second’s perspective, who gave many insights of the chess world of the 80’s, while also talking about the inner thoughts and struggles of a true champion!

All in all, I reached the Grandmaster title, because of hard work and diligence, and the drive to know. Chess is not easy to master, but if you love the game, and you study hard, you will eventually reach your goal!

Has chess helped you become the person you are today?

Yes. I learned how to be disciplined, and thorough as a chess player. It greatly helped me in my academics, because I learned to organize my thoughts and my study material as well! Chess also helped me to appreciate art, because there are many moments, when you realize that you actually create a beautiful motif, or combination, which you can share with fellow competitors and it’s fun to share these moments with other people!

Who is your chess idol and why?

It’s a long list starting with Kasparov, but my favorite players are Tal, Keres, Bronstein and obviously, Ivanchuk!

I am fond of players, who appreciate the beauty of the royal game! It is possible of course to play chess as a sport, but let’s be honest, chess is more than that. It is like mixed martial art, it’s both engaging as an art form, and as a sport!

Is there an advice you could give to a person, who is interested to begin?

When you play chess, focus on the positives, enjoy the game! Chess is meant to be fun, and you know, passionate people will eventually become successful, whether they like it or not!

Would you recommend this game to your family and friends?

Yes, definitely! It is a wonderful pastime, and it helps you to grow as a person. I believe it’s a great tool to teach kids that as in life, sometimes we win, and sometimes we lose, but it’s not a tragedy! It also helped me with my academic,s as it taught me to focus at a young age. I think chess helps you to grow as a person.

Unique Questions

You have been to the Carlsen-Karjakin Match in New York, what was your impression?

It was a thriller, and although very few expected it, but Sergey Karjakin did manage to put Carlsen to test.

How did you get the chance to be at such a prestigious event?

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Casual conversation with GM Robert Hess, Chess.com Commentator at the WCC Venue – Photo by Andras Roder

I was asked to do commentary for a St Louis radio, and I also wrote articles for a Hungarian website. It was a really colorful and fascinating event, I got to meet journalists from all over the world, especially thrilled to meet, and talk with people from American Chess Magazine, Wall Street Journal and Dirk Jan Geuzendam from New in Chess!

I also had a great story at the World Championship. At the press conference, after Game 3, I asked Magnus about playing 17. g4, instead of g3, trying to expand on the Kingside. He first looked at me, if I had some problems with the basics, but the more he looked at it, the more he liked my idea! I really appreciated that he took my question so seriously. That was a great experience as a Grandmaster Journalist! Check out the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFlF1MIbYuw from till 1:31 or read how Mike Klein from Chess.com describes this story aptly from his perspective: https://www.chess.com/de/news/carlsen-can-t-airlift-karjakin-s-berlin-in-round-3-draw-5804

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GM Denes Boros’ suggestion for Calrsen on move 17.g4!? on the demonstration board.

I was really happy with the press conference, but to my surprise, I was even asked by New York Times to give a summary of Game 11. They liked it so much, they asked me to give the final summary for the Carlen-Karjakin Match as well!
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/26/sports/magnus-carlsen-and-sergey-karjakin-in-dead-heat-in-chess-championship.html and my final summary https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/30/nyregion/magnus-carlsen-defends-title-in-world-chess-championship.html

Who did you want to be the next world chess champion- Magnus or Sergey? What is your thought on the event in general.

I did not have a preference, I just wanted to see a hard-fought match for the world title, and I am glad it turned out to be one!

Magnus deservedly won the match, but Sergey was really close, if he would have had a more subtle psychological approach, he would have been even closer to the chess crown!

What do you think about chess psychology?

I studied psychology and I believe that it’s importance will increase in the future.
I think that understanding psychology is crucial in chess, especially on the highest elite level!

Take for example Game 8 and Game 9 of the match. In Game 8, Karjakin was patient and was rewarded for it, paradoxically in Game 9, he should have been more aggressive. Why, because he had the psychological momentum, and you could see from the two player’s body language who was in the driver’s seat! Karjakin missed his chance when he avoided complications in Game 9.

Carlsen on the other hand deserves a lot of credit for staying calm, when everything seemed to go totally astray for him.

Last, but not least, can you tell me what was your most memorable tournament you’ve had abroad – as well as stating how many countries you have been to?

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Playing chess at the St.Louis Chess Club

I have travelled all around the world, and played in three continents and 12 countries! I have been to India, Italy, France, Germany, Czech Republic, just to name a few.
My most memorable event was in St Louis, when I became the Club Champion in 2016. I been to many Chess Clubs, but winning at Saint Louis Chess Club was something special!

Thank you so much to GM Denes Boros on such an interesting interview! If you have any questions for him, please don’t be shy contacting him. More interviews are to come – stay tuned!

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